Standard & Weeping Trees

Cherries

Cheals
Kiku Shidare Sukura
chealscherryedit
One of the best weeping cherries. Deep pink double flowers are produced in great abundance. More upright crown growth than Rosea. The young growth is a spectacular bronze-green colour. Prune in the early years to an upwards-pointing bud to establish tree shape. Annual trimming to shape will maintain a fresh canopy, and keep canes from touching the soil. Grafted onto 1.5–2 metre standards. Flowers after Rosea and Alba.

Pendula Rosea
pendularosea
Small pale pink, single blossoms are produced in mass during early spring. Prune in the early years to an upwards-pointing bud to establish tree shape. Annual trimming to shape will maintain a fresh canopy, and keep canes from touching the soil. Tree will take weeping form thereafter. 1.5–2 metre standards.

Subhirtella Alba
Cherries;SubhirtellaAlba
The flowers are pink in bud but open up to pure-white single flowers. More upright crown growth than Rosea. Flowers profusely and has good autumn colours. An ideal specimen tree. Prune in the early years to an upwards-pointing bud to establish tree shape. Annual trimming to shape will maintain a fresh canopy, and keep canes from touching the soil. Worked on 1.5–2 metre standards.

Mulberry

Weeping Mulberry
Morus alba “Pendula”
Mulberry;WeepingMuberry
Attractive hardly weeping form, grafted at 1.8-2m. Heart-shaped leaves with pale green flowers yielding edible fruit. Prefers sunny positions in fertile, well drained soil. Annual trimming to shape will maintain a fresh canopy, and keep canes from touching the soil. Prune in the early years to an upwards-pointing bud to establish tree shape.

Robinia

Mop Top
Robina;MopTop
A popular garden feature tree. A unique, densely rounded head of fine branches bearing fronds of green compound leaflets. The trunk is grafted at 1.5–2 metres high with the head growing to a ball of 5×5 metres. May be clipped for formal hedges.